January 2020 Reading List

Happy New Year’s!  Below is this month’s reading list with a selection of fiction and non-fiction from our local library.  Our monthly theme books are in addition to this and will be on a separate post.  All descriptions are from the Amazon website and you can click on the title or author to take you to the page.

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Animalia by Graeme Base

A noted artist presents an imaginative, whimsical journey through the letters of the alphabet, in a beautifully illustrated book that introduces a menagerie of familiar and exotic creatures.

Llama Llama and the Bully Goat by Anna Dewdney

Llama Llama is learning lots of new things at school and making many friends. But when Gilroy Goat starts teasing him and some of their classmates, Llama Llama isn’t sure what to do. And then he remembers what his teacher told him—walk away and tell someone. It works! But then Llama Llama feels badly. Can he and Gilroy try to be friends again?

Sometimes Rain by Meg Fleming and Diana Sudyka

Sometimes it rains, sometimes it snows, sometimes the sun shines, and sometimes the trees change color. But no matter what the seasons bring, there is lots of fun to be had! This lyrical exploration of the four seasons and all of the wonder that they bring is illustrated with vibrant watercolors.

Ocean Meets Sky by Terry Fan and Eric Fan

From the creators of the gorgeous bestseller The Night Gardener comes a stunning new picture book about a young boy who sets sail to find a place his grandfather told him about…the spot where the ocean meets the sky.

Have You Seen My Dragon? by Steve Light

In the heart of the city, among the taxis and towers, a small boy travels uptown and down, searching for his friend. Readers will certainly spot the glorious beast, plus an array of big-city icons they can count. Is the dragon taking the crosstown bus, or breathing his fiery breath below a busy street? Maybe he took a taxi to the zoo or is playing with the dogs in the park. Steve Light’s masterful pen-and-ink illustrations, decorated with meticulous splashes of color, elevate this counting book (numbers 1–20) to new heights.

Fire! Fuego! Brave Bomberos by Susan Middleton Elya and Dan Santat

So begins a rollicking race to save a burning casa from the roaring flames-and these bomberos are up to the task, with hoses ready and sirens blaring. Spanish words sprinkled throughout the lively text-plus a glossary at the end-will enrich young readers as they cheer for the firefighters to save the day.

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Firefighter Duckies! by Frank W. Dormer

Frank Dormer is at it again with this quack-out-loud silly story, full of wacky charm and perfect for little duckies of all dispositions.  But when the emergencies requiring their attention become a little overwhelming, the Firefighter Duckies realize that they don’t have to be brave and strong to be helpful and kind.

One Brown Bunny by Marion Dane Bauer and Ivan Bates

Award-winning duo Marion Dane Bauer and Ivan Bates bring counting to life with this new sweet story about friendship!  Join brown bunny in search of friends in the forest. Marion Dane Bauer’s charming and rhythmic text paired with Ivan Bates’s bold illustrations will draw children into a wonderful world of friendship, animals, and counting.

My Beautiful Birds by Suzanne Del Rizzo and Suzane Del Rizzo

A gentle yet moving story of refugees of the Syrian civil war, My Beautiful Birds illuminates the ongoing crisis as it affects its children. It shows the reality of the refugee camps, where people attempt to pick up their lives and carry on. And it reveals the hope of generations of people as they struggle to redefine home.

All Aboard for the Bobo Road by Stephen Davies and Christopher Corr

All aboard for the Bobo Road! Fatima and Galo load the luggage while their dad Big Ali drives the bus. Help count bikes, sacks of rice, melons and even goats and chickens as the bus travels past Gurunsi houses, the hippo lake, waterfalls and jungle, all the way to Bobo. With the authentic setting in Burkina Faso drawn from the author’s own experience, this is a wonderfully fun introduction for small children to an amazing culture.

Llama Llama Misses Mama by Anna Dewdney

It’s Llama Llama’s first day of preschool! And Llama Llama’s mama makes sure he’s ready. They meet the teachers. See the other children. Look at all the books and games. But then it’s time for Mama to leave. And suddenly Llama Llama isn’t so excited anymore. Will Mama Llama come back?

Maisy Goes to the City: A Maisy First Experiences Book by Lucy Cousins

Broom, vroom, beep! Maisy and Charley are in the city, and there are many things to get used to — noisy traffic, enormous buildings, and sidewalks so crowded they have to walk very slowly. Riding the escalator and elevator — and hanging on tight in the subway — are almost as much fun as exploring the giant toy store and eating pizza in a café. Even the playground is busy in the city!

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Saturday by Oge Mora

In this heartfelt and universal story, a mother and daughter look forward to their special Saturday routine together every single week. But this Saturday, one thing after another goes wrong–ruining storytime, salon time, picnic time, and the puppet show they’d been looking forward to going to all week. Mom is nearing a meltdown…until her loving daughter reminds her that being together is the most important thing of all.

Mr. Postmouse Takes a Trip by Marianne Dubuc

The pages of this humorous, playful follow-up to Mr. Postmouse’s Rounds from award-winning author and illustrator Marianne Dubuc overflow with clever details. The simple story of the mouse family’s trip is used to transport children from one fantastically imagined place to the next. Perfect for encouraging visual literacy, this picture book will delight readers and prereaders as they explore it again and again, searching the busy artwork for something new and unexpected, including the cross-section drawings that allow a peek inside the animals’ homes and the many stories-within-a-story appearing in every spread. The scenes provide a terrific introduction to the concepts of community and neighborhoods, as well as modes of transportation.

Nursery Tales Around the World by Judy Sierra and Stefano Vitale

An international collection of 18 nursery tales for young children, grouped by theme, such as “Runaway Cookies,” “Slowpokes and Speedsters,” and “Chain Tales,” and brillantly illustrated with full-color borders.

Colors by Shelley Rotner and Anne Woodhull

Vivid pictures of familiar scenes, animals, and objects inspire young readers to look carefully at the world around them. Full of striking close-ups on fruits, flowers, and animals, as well as striking portraits of kids from diverse backgrounds, Colors is a bright, brilliant concept book from the creator of the award-winning Shades of People.

City Shapes by Diana Murray and Bryan Collier

From shimmering skyscrapers to fluttering kites to twinkling stars high in the sky, everyday scenes become extraordinary as a young girl walks through her neighborhood noticing exciting new shapes at every turn. Far more than a simple concept book, City Shapes is an explosion of life. Diana Murray’s richly crafted yet playful verse encourages readers to discover shapes in the most surprising places, and Bryan Collier’s dynamic collages add even more layers to each scene in this ode to city living.

Just Add Glitter by Angela DiTerlizzi and Samantha Cotterill

It all starts with a mysterious mail delivery, a little girl with a big imagination, and a sprinkling of twinkling glitter. Before long there’s glitter here, glitter there–glitter, glitter EVERYWHERE! But just when she’s about to add more glitter, the little girl realizes maybe there is such a thing as too much bling when you and your best pal start to get lost in it…

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Calling Dr. Zaza by Mylo Freeman

Nominated for a Cybil Literary Award in 2018! Zaza’s animal friends aren’t feeling well today. What do they need? A visit from Dr. Zaza! For toddlers ages 24 months and up, with a focus on the child’s skills.

Most People by Michael Leannah and Jennifer E. Morris

Michael Leannah wrote Most People as an antidote to the scary words and images kids hear and see every day. Jennifer Morris’s emotive, diverting characters provide the perfect complement to Leannah’s words, leading us through the crowded streets of an urban day in the company of two pairs of siblings (one of color). We see what they see: the hulking dude with tattoos and chains assisting an elderly lady onto the bus; the Goth teenager with piercings and purple Mohawk returning a lost wallet to its owner; and the myriad interactions of daily existence, most of them well intended. Most People is a courageous, constructive response to the dystopian world of the news media.

Food Truck Fest! by Alexandra Penfold and Mike Dutton

Join the members of one family as they head to the Food Truck Fest! They gather their things, cross the bridge, and prepare for a fun-filled day. And as they get ready, the workers on the food trucks get ready, too―preparing, tasting, and traveling across the bridge to join all the other kitchens-on-wheels. With delicious free samples and cuisines from around the world, it’s a day of trying new things and having fun together!

The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton

The little house first stood in the country, but gradually the city moved closer and closer. CALDECOTT medal winner.

Swimmy by Leo Lionni

Deep in the sea lives a happy school of fish. Their watery world is full of wonders, but there is also danger, and the little fish are afraid to come out of hiding . . . until Swimmy comes along. Swimmy shows his friends how—with ingenuity and team work—they can overcome any danger. CALDECOTT honor book winner.

Daddy, Me, and the Magic Hour by Laura Krauss Melmed and Sarita Rich

It’s the Magic Hour, when the sun is going down and day meets night. As Daddy and son walk to the playground for some lively fun, they see their neighbors going through their evening rituals—watering plants, walking dogs, going for a run. As darkness sets in, Daddy and son quiet down and find fireflies, then make their way home to Mommy and bedtime.

My Grandpa’s Chair by Jiyeon Pak

Julie’s grandfather is looking for a new chair. But no matter what kind of chair he tries, he can never seem to find the right one. Some chairs are too small; others are too soft. Some are too hard, while others are too fancy. Just when Grandfather thinks he’ll never find the right chair, Julie takes him to a park. And there, Grandfather finally finds the perfect seat . . . and discovers that it’s not about the chair you sit in, it’s about who is sitting next to you.

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